Come Dance With Me

Come dance with me, my love, I care not where.
On a sandy beach, our steps we shall share,
while the sun is high, we waltz, hot and slow,
as our thoughts take on a sensual glow,
and we dream of night, our bodies laid bare.

Take my hand, lead me to a field so fair
where we glide with daisies, without a care,
as rain patters down, and the sun sinks low,
come dance with me…

Hold me tightly in the crisp mountain air,
as dusk gives way to night, without a prayer.
Our bodies sway, ‘neath the moon’s argent glow, 
and we come together, a liquid flow.
With stars in our eyes, one more time, mon cher,
Come dance with me…

©️2021 KT Workman

(Note: A rondeau poem has 15 lines containing 3 stanzas—a quintet, a quatrain, and a sestet. Lines 9 and 15 are short: a refrain consisting of a phrase taken from the 1st line. The other lines are longer (but all of the same metrical length), typically containing 8 to 10 syllables.

Rhyme scheme: a-a-b-b-a, a-a-b-R, a-a-b-b-a-R.)


Image by fsHH from Pixabay

The Cherry on Top

She bonded to him, till death they do part,
And merry they danced to the beat of years,
And picked wildflowers as red as their hearts,
While time flowed by, unencumbered by tears.

Now clumsily they waltz, feet lost asea.
Steps turn to missteps, they cannot keep time.
Shiny love rusts away, no longer cherry.
Respect fades too, scoured in bitter brine.

Time has a way of erasing what’s good
As bad temper, bad times, roll through the home.
He shouts and curses, is constantly rude,
But she’s grown too old to think she can roam.

Patient, but not content, she holds her breath,
Waits not for love, but for respite—sweet death.

©2021 KT Workman

(Note: Shakespearean sonnet—has 14 lines divided into 3 quatrains and a couplet. Each line typically has 10 syllables written in iambic pentameter. Rhyme scheme: a-b-a-b, c-d-c-d, e-f-e-f, gg.)

Image by Clarence Alford from Pixabay